Authors
  • Jones, Jason
  • Pither, Jason
  • DeBruyn, Ryan D.
  • Robertson, Raleigh J.

Summary

In January 1998, the worst ice storm of the last century hit regions of southeastern Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and the northeastern United States. Using multiple standard regression and classification trees, we examined the ice damage in a mature, deciduous forest in eastern Ontario at two scales: plot (5 m radius) and individual tree. Canopy trees have been significantly reduced in size and severity. At the plot scale, the best predictors of damage and average size. Plots dominated by large trees were more likely than those with smaller plots. Models incorporating damage to neighboring plots were more explained than did models without information. At the individual tree scale, the dominant canopy tree species, sugar maple, was best predicted by tree size. Damage suffered by the dominant mid-story tree species, ironwood, was best predicted by neighboring information and tree size. Disturbances that have been shown to be variable and have been shown to accelerate forest succession by creating light gaps. However, given the composition and structure of our forest study, we feel that this disturbance will not influence forest succession in mature, deciduous forests in eastern Ontario. canopy tree species, sugar maple, best predicted by tree size. Damage suffered by the dominant mid-story tree species, ironwood, was best predicted by neighboring information and tree size. Disturbances that have been shown to be variable and have been shown to accelerate forest succession by creating light gaps. However, given the composition and structure of our forest study, we feel that this disturbance will not influence forest succession in mature, deciduous forests in eastern Ontario. canopy tree species, sugar maple, best predicted by tree size. Damage suffered by the dominant mid-story tree species, ironwood, was best predicted by neighboring information and tree size. Disturbances that have been shown to be variable and have been shown to accelerate forest succession by creating light gaps. However, given the composition and structure of our forest study, we feel that this disturbance will not influence forest succession in mature, deciduous forests in eastern Ontario. Disturbances that have been shown to be variable and have been shown to accelerate forest succession by creating light gaps. However, given the composition and structure of our forest study, we feel that this disturbance will not influence forest succession in mature, deciduous forests in eastern Ontario. Disturbances that have been shown to be variable and have been shown to accelerate forest succession by creating light gaps. However, given the composition and structure of our forest study, we feel that this disturbance will not influence forest succession in mature, deciduous forests in eastern Ontario.

Location